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Propogating Carol Mackie daphne


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Diane30-Sep-03 10:45 AM EST 6   
Glen30-Sep-03 08:41 PM EST 7   
Diane05-Oct-03 04:29 PM EST 6   
Patricia 07-Apr-04 06:37 PM EST 5   
Patricia 07-Apr-04 06:37 PM EST 5   


Subject: Propogating Carol Mackie daphne
From: Diane
Zone: 6
Date: 30-Sep-03 10:45 AM EST

I have a large, thriving Carol Mackie daphne that is getting too large for its space beside a path. I would rather create some new plants rather than just prune it. Has anyone done this (successfully)?


Subject: RE: Propogating Carol Mackie daphne
From: Glen
Zone: 7
Date: 30-Sep-03 08:41 PM EST

Diane-tho daphne isn't one I've done personally, I have heard that most or all daphne are quite easy to propagate, usually 100%.

The cuttings should be done in summer, stuck in a peat/sand mix in a shady spot with a poly tent over them to keep it humid. They generally root in a couple months.

Maybe somebody else has first hand experience, but I would certainly give it a try. I just have trouble keeping them alive in the landscape here!

Glen


Subject: RE: Propogating Carol Mackie daphne
From: Diane
Zone: 6
Date: 05-Oct-03 04:29 PM EST

Thanks Glen; I'll give it a try. It's the only daphne that I've had any luck with but boy have I had luck! Diane


Subject: RE: Propogating Carol Mackie daphne
From: Patricia (iris1@rogers.com)
Zone: 5
Date: 07-Apr-04 06:37 PM EST

I have a book called Plants Plus by George Seddon and Andrew Bicknell. It suggests two methods of propagating daphne: 1. semi-ripe cuttings late in summer, planted in half peat, half sand, winter these little plants in a garden frame outdoors or 2. layering - select a branch close to the ground, make a slanting cut half-way through the stem, about 12 inches from the tip. Wedge the cut open with a wooden matchstick. Pin down the cut section and cover with soil. Use a piece of bamboo cane to support the tip of the branch upwards, so the plant grown up and not sideways. Sever the new plant from its parent the following spring. I would tend to try this second method, rather than the first, which is fussy. The wintering part sounds hard to do in Zone 6. Good luck - some people tell me that Daphne is a very difficult plant to grow, and you seem to be doing well with it.


Subject: RE: Propogating Carol Mackie daphne
From: Patricia (iris1@rogers.com)
Zone: 5
Date: 07-Apr-04 06:37 PM EST

I have a book called Plants Plus by George Seddon and Andrew Bicknell. It suggests two methods of propagating daphne: 1. semi-ripe cuttings late in summer, planted in half peat, half sand, winter these little plants in a garden frame outdoors or 2. layering - select a branch close to the ground, make a slanting cut half-way through the stem, about 12 inches from the tip. Wedge the cut open with a wooden matchstick. Pin down the cut section and cover with soil. Use a piece of bamboo cane to support the tip of the branch upwards, so the plant grown up and not sideways. Sever the new plant from its parent the following spring. I would tend to try this second method, rather than the first, which is fussy. The wintering part sounds hard to do in Zone 6. Good luck - some people tell me that Daphne is a very difficult plant to grow, and you seem to be doing well with it.


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