Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Gary15-Sep-03 07:06 PM EST 5a   
Susan16-Sep-03 05:51 AM EST 6a   
Lindsay16-Sep-03 07:46 AM EST 6b   
Lindsay16-Sep-03 07:47 AM EST 6b   


Subject: White pine info ?
From: Gary
Zone: 5a
Date: 15-Sep-03 07:06 PM EST

I live in a very sandy area and I would like to know what to do to transplant some white pines that I have in my yard. They thrive in this area but I have tried transplanting these before with little success. Last time I tried to prep the roots by driving a shovel in around the perimeter of the tree in the late fall and 1 of 4 survived. I now will try to prep the roots earlier, like now Sept.15th and see if it makes a diff. If you have any info to help I would like to know. I also now noticed a lot of yellow needles forming as I think it is stress from the crazy weather we have had, I was wondering if there is anything I can do? What about fertilizing this time of year? Is it too late? I use water soluble fert 30-10-10 Thank you, Gary


Subject: RE: White pine info ?
From: Susan
Zone: 6a
Date: 16-Sep-03 05:51 AM EST

White pines have a wide root system with a vestigal tap root. If the pines you are transplanting are a few years old, maybe you're not getting enough of their root system. However, inadequate water post transplant is the most common reason a transplant would fail. If your soil is sandy and well drained, water would drain away easily so you would have to make sure you water diligently this fall after transplanting but also all of next year too to be sure they are well rooted in their new homes. While I've not tried transplanting white pines (my pines are older and I don't have room for any more...), I've been using the MYKE stuff for all my tree and shrub plantings instead of transplant fertilizer. It seems to work well so you could give that a try...

I wouldn't worry too much about the yellowing of needles. White pines drop 2 and 3 year old needles every October and November. Just before the needles drop, the tree can look like it is dying becuse of all the brown needles! I have several beautiful 60-80 year old white pines gracing my backyard. When the needles drop in late October/early November, there is a several inch deep layer of them under the trees! By spring the needles have settled to a thin layer on the ground that makes a wonderful mulch and doesn't stop the woodland perennials and bulbs from coming up through them. White pines are may favorite trees.


Subject: Virginia Creeper & Siding-A Good Combo?
From: Lindsay
Zone: 6b
Date: 16-Sep-03 07:46 AM EST

Good day,

We've just removed some nasty fibreglass sheeting that was acting as a roof on our back porch. Now, the great debate begins: I'd like to train a vine up the side of the porch to cover the top, so that we still have some protection from the elements, however my husband wants new fibreglass sheeting up there (shudder.)

My question is, would Virginia Creeper be a good choice? I love the look of it, particularly in the Fall, but our house has aluminum siding, and I am concerned about whether the vine will invade its way under the siding...because my husband will never let me hear the end of it if it does!

Can anyone tell me if this is likely to be a problem?

Many thanks, Lindsay


Subject: Virginia Creeper & Siding-A Good Combo?
From: Lindsay
Zone: 6b
Date: 16-Sep-03 07:47 AM EST

Good day,

We've just removed some nasty fibreglass sheeting that was acting as a roof on our back porch. Now, the great debate begins: I'd like to train a vine up the side of the porch to cover the top, so that we still have some protection from the elements, however my husband wants new fibreglass sheeting up there (shudder.)

My question is, would Virginia Creeper be a good choice? I love the look of it, particularly in the Fall, but our house has aluminum siding, and I am concerned about whether the vine will invade its way under the siding...because my husband will never let me hear the end of it if it does!

Can anyone tell me if this is likely to be a problem?

Many thanks, Lindsay


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