General Discussion:

Perennial Morning Glory Feedback


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Brenda23-May-03 08:19 AM EST 3a   
John23-May-03 04:12 PM EST 6a   
JoanneS26-May-03 12:39 PM EST 3a   
grace30-May-03 12:26 AM EST   
Brenda30-May-03 06:16 AM EST 3a   
KW30-May-03 04:30 PM EST   
JoanneS02-Jun-03 01:22 PM EST 3a   
grace04-Jun-03 02:45 AM EST 2b   
Jacqueline04-Jun-03 08:42 AM EST 3a   
JoanneS05-Jun-03 01:18 PM EST 3a   
grace05-Jun-03 05:42 PM EST 2b   
Brenda05-Jun-03 08:27 PM EST 3a   
06-Jun-03 12:18 AM EST 2   
Jacqueline06-Jun-03 11:14 AM EST 3   
JoanneS06-Jun-03 01:19 PM EST 3a   
Brenda06-Jun-03 07:03 PM EST 3a   


Subject: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: Brenda
Zone: 3a
Date: 23-May-03 08:19 AM EST

Last year, Holes (in Edmonton) was selling a pink perennial morning glory vine.

Did this plant made it through the winter for any of you?

Your feedback is appreciated!


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: John (deusex@bentdesign.com)
Zone: 6a
Date: 23-May-03 04:12 PM EST

I bought that one last year and it hasn't come back this year - It was in a very large planter 5x5x4 box but exposed to a nasty north wind. I blame it on this horrid winter.

Really a shame, as it was very pretty!


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: JoanneS (jstraayer@specialty.ab.ca)
Zone: 3a
Date: 26-May-03 12:39 PM EST

Brenda, I bought one last year at Holes as well. Previously, I owned a white one at my old house. Judging from my previous experience with the white one, they start really, really late in the spring. No sign of my pink one yet, but I won't rule it out for a couple more weeks. Things got off to a slow start and my tulips are only now just starting to bloom.

Good luck.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: grace
Zone:
Date: 30-May-03 12:26 AM EST

Oh, I'd LOVE to get some perennial morning glories. I'll have to look for them next week at Holes.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: Brenda
Zone: 3a
Date: 30-May-03 06:16 AM EST

Thanks Joanne. I would appreciate hearing about your progress. I am also curious where you planted yours (sun/shade), sheltered spot or not.

I have done some internet research and found only a couple of zonal references for this plant as zone 4 and the requirement of full sun.

Two other names noted for this plant are: Calystegia Hederacea "Flore Pleno" (not Flora Plena as the Holes tag says) and Japanese False Bindweed.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: KW
Zone:
Date: 30-May-03 04:30 PM EST

Some comments on morning glory from this site. http://plantsdatabase.com/go/2890/

Another site that has pictures of different morning glories.

http://ideboda.tripod.com/

You may wish to contact the expert there too.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: JoanneS (jstraayer@specialty.ab.ca)
Zone: 3a
Date: 02-Jun-03 01:22 PM EST

Monday, no sign of life. Friday, I noticed the first piece, and by Sunday evening, I counted 7 sprouts. It's baaaaack.

Thanks for the info on the correct name.

At my old house, two doors down the street, I had a single, white one in horrible soil in full shade, and it was fabulous. Was surrounded by a sidewalk, a thin strip of dirt under the eaves of the house. Contained and therefore not a problem. The plant is still there, growing nicely.

I have my current double pink one in a similar location, although this spot gets some sun. Only planted last summer. It did not do too much, but neither did the white one its first year. Both plants are next to the foundation, and will get almost no water.

Both plants are on the north-east side of the houses, relatively sheltered because our houses are so close together.

The plants seems to be off and running now. I have no idea how tall my pink will grow, but if it grows as well as the white one, it will look fabulous climbing up the side of the house.

Have you noticed yours up yet?


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: grace
Zone: 2b
Date: 04-Jun-03 02:45 AM EST

Joanne, I think I will try finding one in Edmonton yet. I'm helping my daughter plant flowers this spring and I think the morning glories would be gorgeous in her northeast garden. Oh, I HOPE I can find some. I know it's getting kind of late. Could you recommend some greenhouses in the Edmonton area...near the west end, if possible.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: Jacqueline
Zone: 3a
Date: 04-Jun-03 08:42 AM EST

Just a word of caution Calystegia Hederacea spreads by under ground roots and is a mover I had some shoots 5 feet away from the mother plant in it's second year I would strongly suggest that you dig it up and keep in a pot to contain it will take over moving further from the mother plant each year It got into my grass and even with many applications of round up have not slowed it down much I would put this plant up there with goutweed


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: JoanneS (jstraayer@specialty.ab.ca)
Zone: 3a
Date: 05-Jun-03 01:18 PM EST

Grace, you are correct. The white was was very vigorous, and I was warned when I bought the pink one; however, like goutweed, in the right place it is fabulous. It is also important to make sure you do not plant it where it will be a problem for your neighbours. Just because you want it next to your garage, doesn't mean your neighbour wants it creeping into his vegetable garden.

Grace, I bought mine at Holes Greenhouse in St. Albert. I had not seen it anywhere else. Holes is not cheap, but the quality and variety of plants available cannot be beat. It is easy to get to from the west end, and well worth the trip. I also looooooove Apache Seed, (149 street & just off stony plain road) but they don't often carry really unusual plants. I've also been hearing good things about Arch Greenhouse, but have never been there myself. Also in the west end is Nature's Ever Blooming Garden Centre (107 avenue & approx. 160 street???).

My first choice would be a trip to Holes. If you can't find what you want there, then try Natures.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: grace
Zone: 2b
Date: 05-Jun-03 05:42 PM EST

Thanks, Joanne! I'll suggest that to my daughter. We might just go to Hole's yet. A perennial I bought this year in town is a mallow. It has fushia coloured flowers with bright veins and it can grow quite tall. I'm putting them in full sun.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: Brenda
Zone: 3a
Date: 05-Jun-03 08:27 PM EST

Thanks Joanne for the info. I would appreciate hearing back from you mid summer to see how it's doing and how long it blooms.

I purchased 2 plants from Holes about 2 weeks ago and have been trying to gather some information before planting. As I do not have a completely "contained" area like you Joanne, I am becoming paranoid (based on Jacqueline’s comments).

Jacqueline, I would appreciate knowing if you are growing the "white" or "double pink" variety. I am wondering if the double pink one is not as invasive as the white. For example, several years ago I was warned NOT to plant hops. I now have 5 mature plants of the golden variety. This is the main vine in my garden that I can really count on for coverage. I believe that the golden variety is not as aggressive as the regular one. In warmer climates I can see this being a big problem, but “invasive” in zone 3 is sometimes a good thing!

Joanne and Jacqueline - what should I do? Plant them or not?? The spot I have is against the house but it can spread outward. I do not have a completely enclosed area.

I would really appreciate your advice.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From:
Zone: 2
Date: 06-Jun-03 12:18 AM EST

regarding any plant like morning glory that can be very invasive,I plant those type of plants in pails with the bottom cut out like pie filling pails from a friendly bakery or cafe,usually very reasonable.Keeps these plants contained.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: Jacqueline
Zone: 3
Date: 06-Jun-03 11:14 AM EST

Story Time! About 10 years ago i saw this lovely little plant with double pink rose like flowers that fade to white, growing against the wall of the garage (i was amazed this was the litter box for every cat in a 10km radius should have been my first clue but it was not to be) I dug up the poor thing and moved to the chain link fence that summer it grew nicely and rewarded with lots of blooms what a Great Plant! the following spring i moved in to my present home and took a slip with me, i have a mature garden, raised beds and well composted soil I planted on the west side of the garage gave it a trellis to grow on and it was lovely, the following spring is when the trouble started it took off like a house on fire, like i said earlier it sent shoots 5 feet from the mother plant and that summer grew up the trellis on to the garage roof !. Joanne it grew under a 4 foot sidewalk and came up in my grass i knew i had a problem then. I tried to dig up as much as i could (it has roots similar to goutweed and if you leave piece no mater how small you have new plant) being a mature garden it was very difficult to dig it out with out moving every thing in the way which i ended up doing, the roots can grow anywhere from 1 to 3 feet deep i have been battling this plant for 10 years now and still have it popping up, this year i notice it in my south bed 10 feet from where it was originally planted it is now in with the honeysuckle vine, i use round-up painted on the leaves to keep it at bay but I'm sure that it will out last me! Now with that said you can grow it in a deep pot dug into the ground, i would not cut the bottom of it i would plug the holes, this thing is hardy it lived though the spring of 2000 didn't miss a heart beat when so many things died, and if anyone wants some i sure i can find a shoot or 10 ! P.S I stopped in at my old house and yes it still coming up there too after many round-up treatments


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: JoanneS (jstraayer@specialty.ab.ca)
Zone: 3a
Date: 06-Jun-03 01:19 PM EST

Grace, you will like that mallow. I have volunteers each year of this one and a pink one. Free seeds vigorously, but I just pull out the ones in the wrong spots.

Jacqueline, your first mistake was to be nice to it in the first place. Haven't we all done this with a plant over the years? Mine was Himalayan Balsam. I thought they were so nice. Tall, pretty pink flowers, and the children loved popping the seed pods. I now rue the day I ever introduced this plant into my garden. But, the kids still love to pop those seed pods.

Brenda, I was able to control my white one quite well. We'll see what happens with the pink one, but I'd still go ahead and plant yours. You've bought them so it would be a shame to throw them out. If you really hate them, persistent use of round up will eventually get rid of them entirely. That is how I got rid of goutweed. It took four years, but it was only a little piece here and there after the second year. Not a mass invasion. Perennial morning glory looks a lot like bindweed and I know I've mistaken the two. I actually let bindweed grow up my power pole before I realized what it wasn't.

We have a harsh climate, and I find the cold helps to control some plants.


Subject: RE: Perennial Morning Glory Feedback
From: Brenda
Zone: 3a
Date: 06-Jun-03 07:03 PM EST

Thank you Jacqueline and Joanne for your input. It is at times like this that I really appreciate this forum.

After reading Jacqueline's comments this a.m. I decided that I will return my 2 plants back to Holes. I don't want to risk a potential invasion.

I had a horrible experience this spring with an invasive perennial that I planted two years ago. It is "firecracker" fringed loosestrife (don't worry - not the bad purple one). It has beautiful dark burgundy foliage with small yellow flowers (available at all the greenhouses).

I planted maybe 10 plants or so around my garden and have spent a good chunk of this spring digging it out. The problem is that it spread and sent up shoots into the middle of adjacent plants. While digging this out I couldn’t believe how much soil the roots consumed and how far they spread.

I usually research new additions to my garden but I didn't with this one (I didn’t imagine that it would be this bad). I have since referenced my “Heritage" Perennial Gardening Guide and sure enough - the spread of the plant is listed as 30 - 36 inches.

Joanne, it appears that your barrier is a good one, hence the lack of spreading. In my environment - it won't work as my soil is well composted and I don’t have a proper barrier. I don't want another incident like the firecracker loosestrife!

Thanks again to the both of you for your great input.


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