Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
jtwheeler3505-Apr-03 06:24 PM EST 5b   
Budding Poet06-Apr-03 03:06 AM EST 5a   
Susan06-Apr-03 10:09 AM EST 6a   
jtwheeler3506-Apr-03 05:33 PM EST 5b   
Susan06-Apr-03 09:29 PM EST 6a   
jtwheeler3508-Apr-03 05:40 AM EST 5b   
Susan08-Apr-03 07:18 AM EST 6a   


Subject: Plant ID help needed
From: jtwheeler35
Zone: 5b
Date: 05-Apr-03 06:24 PM EST

I have this tall large leafed plant growing in my north facing part of my yard. I planted it as a castor bean but that's not what I got! The large fuzzy leaves are about 14" across - grows about 8' tall - the main stalk supports several leaves shooting off 20" stems and then in summer it flowers the largest Queen Anne's Lace looking saucer sized flowers I've ever seen! The flowers are white and I notice flies and bees love to just sit on the flower. The plant's color is about grass green in color if not lighter - but fuzzy. If you have any clue, please let me know! I've already ruled out a tetrapanax since it isn't hardy in my zone 5b - but it's leaves do resemble that plant - not the flowers. JT


Subject: RE: Plant ID help needed
From: Budding Poet (CBRIAN@attcanada.ca)
Zone: 5a
Date: 06-Apr-03 03:06 AM EST

Jt

Sounds like cow parsnip, hogweed, Heracleum lanatum Below are some pictures that might be your spurious castor bean plant.

http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=ghs.gresham.k12.or.us/science/ps/nature/denali/flora/5/parsley/heracleum.jpg&imgrefurl=http://ghs.gresham.k12.or.us/science/ps/nature/denali/flora/5/parsley/heracleum.htm&h=341&w=229&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dheracleum%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26sa%3DG


Subject: RE: Plant ID help needed
From: Susan
Zone: 6a
Date: 06-Apr-03 10:09 AM EST

My first thought was the same a Budding Poet's, but you'd better hope that's not what it is - that stuff can cause major skin irritation. A more benign possibility is something like angelica archangelica. Unfortunately, while there are a fair number of pictures on the Web of it, none of them that I found are really good. If you have a book on herbs, look for pictures in there.... I


Subject: RE: Plant ID help needed
From: jtwheeler35
Zone: 5b
Date: 06-Apr-03 05:33 PM EST

YES!!!!!!!!!! That's it!!!!!!!! Finally, this is the 3rd forum I have been on and I finally got my answer...thank you all so very much. Yes, it does make my skin itch when I brush against it. It really is a beautiful plant and seems odd to have it in my very small front yard. Is it possible to move this plant to a different location in my yard with that tap root or it it best to kill it? It really doesn't have that pleasant of a smell but is not an overwhelming smell nevertheless. What do you think.


Subject: RE: Plant ID help needed
From: Susan
Zone: 6a
Date: 06-Apr-03 09:29 PM EST

While it has impressive flowers, I really don't think you want Giant Hogweed in your garden. If you get the plant juices on your skin and then get exposed to sunlight, you can get quite severe blistering and dermatitis I understand. I gather it can be particularly bad in children. I think the plant is short lived but, like most members of that botanical family, it self seeds freely. If you don't at least deadhead, you may find your yard full of impressive-looking but very hostile plants!

If you want the same look without the toxic properties, try planting one of the larger angelicas, such as the angelica archangelica or angelica gigas, which has pinky-purple flowers. They all attract butterflies but also are all short lived self seedwes so you'd have to weed out seedlings each year to prevent them from taking over while still keeping a few around for the garden.


Subject: RE: Plant ID help needed
From: jtwheeler35
Zone: 5b
Date: 08-Apr-03 05:40 AM EST

I should probably take your advice on this and get rid of the plant - but I haven't seen any angelica available in any local garden centers. Do you know where I could aquire seeds?


Subject: RE: Plant ID help needed
From: Susan
Zone: 6a
Date: 08-Apr-03 07:18 AM EST

Richter's sells both seeds and plants. See:

http://www.richters.com/Web_store/web_store.cgi?product=X1130&cart_id=7176702.21121

I really do think you would be safer with the Angelica! When you remove the hogwed (if it comes back this year), be very careful - wear gloves and wash the gloves off well afterwards. Watch out for seedlings if you let it set seed last year. Like the hogweed, Angelica is also short-lived and seeds freely so you might want to let a few flowers set seed to collect while deadheading most of them to minimize the number of random seedlings that might appear in the garden in future years.


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