Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Sylvia19-Aug-02 12:34 AM EST 3a   
Nicole19-Aug-02 09:42 AM EST 6a   
Brenda R19-Aug-02 02:22 PM EST 3a   
JoanneS22-Aug-02 12:25 PM EST 3a   
Lyn28-Aug-02 11:40 PM EST 3a   
stan29-Aug-02 01:38 PM EST 3   
JoanneS03-Sep-02 05:06 PM EST 3a   


Subject: rose buds
From: Sylvia (sylviageertruida@hotmail.com)
Zone: 3a
Date: 19-Aug-02 12:34 AM EST

My "Terese Bugnet" roses are in trouble! I bought the hardiest rose I could find for my Edmonton garden. When I open the flowers up they have many tiny black bugs in them. Could they be causing this? I tried powder and liquid insecticides, but to no avail. Anyone?


Subject: RE: rose buds are
From: Nicole (rnrdearman@hfx.eastlink.ca)
Zone: 6a
Date: 19-Aug-02 09:42 AM EST

Oooh... I'll be watching for answers as I seem to be having the same problem. Buds are there, but they won't bloom. Never thought of pulling one apart to see if anything was inside... Let me go see.. Later.


Subject: RE: rose buds are
From: Brenda R
Zone: 3a
Date: 19-Aug-02 02:22 PM EST

About three years ago, when I planted my first rose bushes, I was told to spray them (twice a year) with a product called "Floritect". The product is available at most greenhouses (this recommendation was given to me by Holes).

Since then, my roses are always beautiful, no eaten leaves, no fungus or black spot.

The reason this product is so exceptional for roses is because it is a "systemic" (absorbs into the plant - when the bugs start eating they die) and treats BOTH bugs and fungus. With roses, it is sometimes hard to diagnose what the problem is and this way I don't have to guess.

The first application I make is always in the late spring when the leaves are fully open, the next application is mid summer. I have followed this routine every year without a problem.

Some gardeners may not agree with spraying a plant whether it needs it or not, but inevitably the bugs will come and this way I can treat them all at once and have healthy, happy roses.

Happy Gardening!


Subject: RE: rose buds are
From: JoanneS (jstraayer@specialty.ab.ca)
Zone: 3a
Date: 22-Aug-02 12:25 PM EST

I too use a systemic on my roses to prevent the same problem with sucking insects. I use the paint method of Cygon. I swab the stem in early spring and then walk away. I do not use it every year because it is fairly toxic, and I find that every other year works well enough for me. I don't like to use the soil drench method because I don't want to pour it in the soil.

I also use Cygon on other plants that suffer from sucking insects, but again, only every other year. A list of eligible plants is in the package. It says you can use it on food crops, but I'd rather not.

It works, but it is toxic so please be careful.


Subject: RE: rose buds are
From: Lyn
Zone: 3a
Date: 28-Aug-02 11:40 PM EST

Can Cygon be used on young roses or should I use Floritect?


Subject: RE: rose buds are
From: stan
Zone: 3
Date: 29-Aug-02 01:38 PM EST

Sylvia, I think what you have is a bug called "rose curcillio". Looks like a lady bug but with a long snout. I pierces a small hole in the stem or in the flower bud then turns around and lays eggs in the hole. The eggs hatch and suck out the juices. Very frustrating. I guess I'll have to get some of that floritect Brenda uses.


Subject: RE: rose buds are
From: JoanneS (jstraayer@specialty.ab.ca)
Zone: 3a
Date: 03-Sep-02 05:06 PM EST

Lyn, I use cygon on my young roses as well. You paint the strip around the stem, the same width as the stem. Therefore, bigger stems get bigger paint bands.


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