Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Carol10-Mar-02 03:35 PM EST 4a   
dee19-Mar-02 10:43 AM EST 5a   
Ed19-Mar-02 08:17 PM EST 5b   
Carol20-Mar-02 12:02 AM EST   
Dee20-Mar-02 06:06 AM EST 5a   
JoanneS22-Mar-02 01:26 PM EST 3a   
Carol23-Mar-02 12:11 AM EST 4a   
Greg23-Mar-02 10:41 AM EST 6a   
Betty23-Mar-02 02:46 PM EST 5a   
donna@icangarden.com23-Mar-02 10:56 PM EST 3a   
Greg24-Mar-02 09:51 AM EST 6a   
Dan25-Mar-02 02:28 PM EST   


Subject: barberry is back
From: Carol
Zone: 4a
Date: 10-Mar-02 03:35 PM EST

Hi, I have been reading about the return of Barberry. I have had a barberry hedge at my home for a very long time. It is extremely thorney, easily stabing through gloves. I would suggest if you get it to put it where there isn't much foot traffic, and away from where you will be weeding with your hands.(ouch) Carol


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: dee
Zone: 5a
Date: 19-Mar-02 10:43 AM EST

Hi Carol - could you tell me a little about barberry - can it be grown in shade, what kind of soil, is it wild and untidy, or does it grow neatly, does it have any flowers, etc. - thanks


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: Ed
Zone: 5b
Date: 19-Mar-02 08:17 PM EST

I have not yet seen which barberries are again available, but before they were discontiued some 20 years ago, the most popular hedge size was offered in green or red (deep blood red ), that formed a neat, compact hedge when trimmed to about 2' high and wide. For maximum rich colour, the red required full sun. Additionally, red barberry was, and probably will again be available in a vigourous tall version of 5-6', as well as a delightful pygmy, never more than 6 inches tall. Flowers? If present, are inconspicuous and really not necessary on a plant noted primarily for variation of size, and foliage colour.


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: Carol
Zone:
Date: 20-Mar-02 12:02 AM EST

Hi Dee, I had a hedge that had red-orange berries, and stood at least 6 feet high. It has a small flower in the spring white I think, but it was more noticable because of the fragrence, I didn't really like it much. I guess it must have been at least 30 or more years old. It was in a partly sunny and partly shady spot. I hope this helps.


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: Dee
Zone: 5a
Date: 20-Mar-02 06:06 AM EST

Thank you for the info. It sounds like a plant worth looking into. As I live in a single-storey cottage, I think if I plant something very spiny and thorny at the base of the windows, it would probably make a very effective break-in deterrent!!


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: JoanneS
Zone: 3a
Date: 22-Mar-02 01:26 PM EST

I think this shrub could be just what I need for my front yard. I just need a low-growing barrier to deter the kids and dogs from trampling my flower beds. And I want it relatively low so that I can still show off the flower beds. Is it hardy to my zone?


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: Carol
Zone: 4a
Date: 23-Mar-02 12:11 AM EST

Hi Joanne, I lived in Toronto when I had the hedge, so I'm not sure if your zone would be too cold. Dee that is a wonderful idea, and I am sure it would work well as a break in deterrent. Carol


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: Greg
Zone: 6a
Date: 23-Mar-02 10:41 AM EST

Just a caution. When I saw this post, barberry rang a bell (long buried information from University) so I did a search. Barberry is an intermediate host for stem rust which wiped out wheat crops at the turn of the century. There was an eradication program in the northern states until the 70's. In Ontario it is still considered a noxious weed - like ragweed, loostrife and poison ivy. I know barberry was not available for many years because of this problem. None of the sites mentioned whether these are still controlled or if there are any regulations about growing barberry. It could be that they have developed strains that don't carry the blight. Also, it may not be an issue in urban areas which aren't near crops. However, I couldn't find any other info. Sorry for the long (and unfortunately negative) post. I just thought you should be aware of this.

If anyone knows any more baout the status of barberry, please let us know.

Here are a couple of sites:

http://www.gov.on.ca/OMAFRA/english/crops/facts/info_barberry.htm

http://www.cdl.umn.edu/barberry/barberry.html


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: Betty
Zone: 5a
Date: 23-Mar-02 02:46 PM EST

I thought read somewhere that the restriction had been lifted this year, but can not remember where I saw it. I have one bush, hate to go near it to trim out the dead branches but the flowers attract the bees, and the birds love to nest in it as well as eat the berries. It would definitely be a deterrent but just remember you will have handle those branches when pruning to keep neat and low for a hedge.


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: donna@icangarden.com
Zone: 3a
Date: 23-Mar-02 10:56 PM EST

You can read more on this on Art Drysdale's site

http://www.artdrysdale.com/april2000.html

This article was written in 2000 on the subject..


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: Greg
Zone: 6a
Date: 24-Mar-02 09:51 AM EST

Donna. Thanks for the link to Art's page. That fills in the gap for me on where the barberry situation is now. I'm guessing since they are only allowing certain varieties in that these are less succeptible to stem rust. Has anyone seen any barberry in the garden centres yet? Greg


Subject: RE: barberry is back
From: Dan
Zone:
Date: 25-Mar-02 02:28 PM EST

Hi folks, I'm sure barberry will be widely available soon. In Ontario, Connon nurseries offers both the green and purple leafed varieties. Go to www.connon.ca. My experience, as a farmer, with this plant was that it was considered an alternate host for oat rust; oats being a commonly grown crop in the Ottawa valley at the time. As Greg mentions, there was a good deal of negative press about this plant. In the late 70's and early 80's there was quite a push on to remove this plant. Times change. If I lived in downtown Toronto or Ottawa, etc. I would plant it. If I lived in a suburban area near farms with small grain crops, I would not plant it.


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