General Discussion:

Annuals that don't need deadheading


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Connie18-Aug-01 08:36 PM EST 1a   
Linda19-Aug-01 12:21 AM EST   
Kay19-Aug-01 09:33 AM EST 2b   
Betty19-Aug-01 08:51 PM EST 5a   
JoanneS20-Aug-01 03:02 PM EST 3a   
Connie20-Aug-01 05:47 PM EST 1a   
Rose 22-Aug-01 08:26 PM EST 5b   
Kathy22-Aug-01 10:03 PM EST 5   
Samantha22-Aug-01 11:39 PM EST
22-Aug-01 11:40 PM EST   
Connie23-Aug-01 01:26 AM EST 1a   
Kay23-Aug-01 11:23 AM EST 2b   
23-Aug-01 01:10 PM EST   
peggy24-Aug-01 01:04 AM EST   
Kay24-Aug-01 01:42 AM EST 2b   
Connie11-Sep-01 03:25 PM EST 1a   
Ann11-Sep-01 07:33 PM EST 4b   
Linda L12-Sep-01 10:01 PM EST   
Connie13-Sep-01 01:29 PM EST 1a   
14-Sep-01 03:08 PM EST   


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Connie
Zone: 1a
Date: 18-Aug-01 08:36 PM EST

Ever hear the expression "my eyes were bigger than my stomach"? Well, that's the way I am with flowers.

My arthritis has been so bad these past 4 days even though it's beeen extremely hot that I am finding it a chore to keep up with the deadheading and watering of my flowers.

I have already decided that I will have no flowers in containers next year, just some in the 2 flower beds; one below my living room window, the other below the dining room window and perhaps 1 hanging basket.

I need the names of some annuals that require no deadheading and very little watering as I'm just not physically up to looking after flowers that need daily attention. My preference would be something pink, if possible. Thanks in advance for your suggestions and experiences.

While we're at it, is there anyone out there with any good solutions for the pain of osteoarthritis (mainly in my hips and lower back)?

I take glucosomine and chondroitin daily and it helped a lot when I first started taking it last November but these last 4 days have been unbelieveable torture! I cannot take anti-inflammatories as I have a stomach ulcer. Any help on either question would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance! As ever, Connie


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Linda
Zone:
Date: 19-Aug-01 12:21 AM EST

As boring as it might sound but Petunias, snapdragons, laventera keep blooming without deadheading.

Raising the beds will help make the beds easier to care for.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Kay
Zone: 2b
Date: 19-Aug-01 09:33 AM EST

First of all, enjoy your flowers, seed heads and all. If the old arthritis is acting up, rest yourself and don't worry about how the garden looks. I find petunias look very unhappy after a rain. I stopped growing them for that reason. Perhaps the newer varieties are better. Veronica (a very easy to grow perennial) just keeps on blooming at the top. Still looks good. Bachelors' buttons, the tall ones. Shirley and Iceland poppies. Consider the seed heads decorative! The seed heads don't show up much. Cosmos. Sweet peas. Pansies. I don't dead head very much because I would be out there all day. As for the arthritis, keep up the glucosomine etc. For my knees I use heat packs made from wheat that I heat in the microwave. There is a wealth of information on arthritis at the Canadian Arthritis Association website. A good doctor is invaluable. Raised beds are nice but hard to build and need extra water. Best of luck from Kay.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Betty
Zone: 5a
Date: 19-Aug-01 08:51 PM EST

Do you have children near by that would give you a hand? You can give directions and they get a great learning experience. Most children like to help with simple tasks in the garden, and as long as one is patient with them, I find they can be very helpful. There are also gardening tools that are made for people with disabilities that can make working in the garden easier as well. But if you can not get the dead heading done, just think of all the great plants that will be springing up the next year from the seeds. I find my hollyhocks are withstanding the drought very well and do not need deadheading. You also can get some very pretty shades of pink, both single and doubles.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: JoanneS
Zone: 3a
Date: 20-Aug-01 03:02 PM EST

As a busy mom I don't have much time for deadheading. My favourite annuals are the wave petunias for the sun (a beautiful bright pink) and the double impatiens for the shade, which come in lots of colours and look like little roses. Both have done very well for me in containers or in the ground.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Connie
Zone: 1a
Date: 20-Aug-01 05:47 PM EST

Thank you, Joanne, for your idea of putting waves into the flowerbeds. I love petunias and they smell heavenly, withstand the frost, and remind me of my grandma who used to grow the regular, single petunias in her windowboxes. About how far apart would you plant them? I think that a variety of colors alternated would be very pretty and all I'd have to worry about then would be the watering, not the deadheading which seems to take forever. I must admit though that I do deadhead my waves in the hanging baskets even though I know I really don't need to.

Thanks to everyone else for their suggestions as well. The children in the neighborhood do love to help me and I appreciate the help they do give me. However, there are times when I'd just prefer to be alone with my plants and my thoughts. I find flowers to be food for the soul.

As for the osteoarthritis, I purchased some MSM and find that it, along with the glucosomine and chondroitin, make it bearable. I cannot remember a day when I've actually been pain free but life goes on and we must accept the hand we are dealt. My husband and I have often said that one of our greatest challenges in life is learning how to grow old gracefully.

Best wishes to all!

Connie


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Rose
Zone: 5b
Date: 22-Aug-01 08:26 PM EST

Greetings Connie:

I too have a stomach ulcer and arthritis. To aid both conditions I use some natural alternatives: ginger in almost every meat dish I prepare (at least 1 tsp. and you cannot taste it!) and pineapple in cooking and just for a snack or dessert (fresh is preferable, but canned works almost as well. You may like to try these methods - I really know it when I 'forget' to have enough of either one!

As for your deadheading problems, I cannot offer any solutions other than what has already spoken of.

Take care and keep growing. www.ComeToTheGarden.Homestead.com.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Kathy
Zone: 5
Date: 22-Aug-01 10:03 PM EST

Hello Connie,

As for annual that don't need deadheading, I would suggest wax begonia's. There super and deadhead themselves! Also, impatients are great in the shade and never need deadheading. Wax begonia's will take shade or sun and are drought tolerant. They have many different leaf colors and flower colors. The flower colors for begonia's are red, pink, white. As for a solution to your arthritis, have you ever consulted a doctor about a nerve block? It is supposed to give immediate relief for up to several years. Check it out and see if you are a candidate.

Take care and happy gardening!!


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Samantha
Date: 22-Aug-01 11:39 PM EST

For kind of pain that you've describe- I cannot imagine how your life is effected. I noticed that nobody has suggested somethings like meditation, deep breathing exercises...eventually maybe Yoga, hypnosis or even medicinal cannabis- I mean they're great options to consider- sounds as though you are ready to try something new to you in pain mgmt... consult with a homeopathic Doctor- check their credentials. Best of luck.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From:
Zone:
Date: 22-Aug-01 11:40 PM EST


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Connie
Zone: 1a
Date: 23-Aug-01 01:26 AM EST

Thank you, everyone, for all the great ideas!

Rose, I wonder what it is in ginger and pineapple that helps relieve pain but I will certainly give it a try.

Kathy, what is a nerve block? I have a doctor's appointment on Friday and would like to know before then, if possible, so I can ask him about it.

Both my flowerbeds get the south sunshine all day long. Do you think that wax begonias would survive there? I live very far north so this means up to 16 to 18 hours of sunlight on our longest days. Some days it's even too hot for me to go outside!

Samantha, I do slow stretches and get plenty of exercise and deep breathing as I pack water to my flowers. Lovingly, I water them every second day with rain water which I pack from behind the house to the flower beds in the front of the house and to the container plants that have filled my front foyer.

I have tried visualization and it does help when I remember to do it but with an active life it is hard to make time for it. I do meditate but only on things that I've learned. I am going to make an appointment with a homeopathic doctor in January. However, no matter how bad the pain gets, I would never resort to cannabis or hypnosis!

I do thank you for your suggestions though and we'll see if the homeopathic doctor has any solutions for me.

To all who have written, I appreciate your suggestions and concern and thank you all very much!

Sincerely,

Connie


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Kay
Zone: 2b
Date: 23-Aug-01 11:23 AM EST

Someone mentioned the challenge of aging, and sometimes it is a real challenge, isn't it. But if we work on our coping mechanisms all the time, it makes things much easier. It's like a spider on a web. If you watch, you will see that he is always fixing it somewhere. It is the same with us. We need our own network, be it family, friends, or online pals.

Someone saw fit to pull out some of the beautiful flowers that grew along the front of our property the other night. My husband worked so hard on that flower bed, and it was for the enjoyment of all. The tallest and most beautiful of the blossoms were torn out by their roots. My grand daughter said, well, Grandma, now you have a beautiful bouquet in the house. Its' true. Rich orange lilies, the kind that curve their petals back on themselves, tall blue bachelor buttons, veronica, and others now grace my table.

I like the idea of using ginger in the meat dishes, and pineapple, too. I use a criterion for deciding if to use a herbal remedy. If it doesn't cost anything, won't hurt us, and may help, I go for it. We grow our own herbs, and know that we get the real thing, not weeds or dust or whatever. Helps us to stay away from salt.

Kay.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From:
Zone:
Date: 23-Aug-01 01:10 PM EST

Kay and Connie,

Connie, I put two wave petunias in my windowboxes and the mass produced is unbelievable. I suppose I would plant them 1.5 to 2 feet apart.

Kay, your story reminds me of one on our block. Neighbour A planted lots of tulips in front of her hedge. They came up and were doing beautifully, until some awful "vandal" tore them out of the ground, and then just left them there. Two years later, I'm talking to neighbour B, this story comes up and she guiltily admits that it was her then 4 year old who thought the flowers were pretty. By the time mom got to her, it was too late, and too embarrassed to say anything, neighbour B just left the flowers there. She told neighbour A, and no hard feelings anywhere from neighbour A, she was glad to know it was just a small child not knowing any better as opposed to reckless vandalism.

Tulips came back and little miss learned not to pick other people's flowers, no matter how pretty. My mom has a similar story about me when I was small.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: peggy
Zone:
Date: 24-Aug-01 01:04 AM EST

thanx for all your observations on gardening with arthritis. I find the most frustrating thing is having to pace one self & not being able to have at it from dawn to dusk if you feel like it. Does anyone have any suggestions on downsizing an existing extensive perennial garden to make it more manageable without getting rid of it totally.My mom has always enjoyed her lovely yard but due to arthritis & other health issues can no longer keep it up. A frustrated gardener is hard to live with.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Kay
Zone: 2b
Date: 24-Aug-01 01:42 AM EST

We have a volunteer group who have done many beautiful low maintenance sites. I often look at them and hope to put some of their ideas into place here at home. Included are low maintenance shrubs planted in landscape fabric with gravel on top of the fabric. There are some flower beds, irises, roses, potentilla, some evergreens. They really do look nice all year. Will take a drive around and try to be more specific in my next post.

Re the flowers that were pulled out, they were big well rooted perennials, that would take some strength to get them out of the ground. They were tossed up to fifteen feet away. Wish I could think it was little kids!

Kay.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Connie
Zone: 1a
Date: 11-Sep-01 03:25 PM EST

Kay, I'm so sorry about someone pulling out your flowers. Were you able to replant them? Your reference to a spider's web and comparing it to our coping abilities with dealing with life's problems is a wonderful way of looking at things. Nature has so much to teach us, doesn't it? All we need to do is open our eyes and take it all in.

Thank you to everyone who has given me solutions to my gardening and my arthritis problems. My arthritis is much better at present due to some of the tips that I've implemented and I'm pretty sure I've figured out what I will do flower wise next year. I wish you all much happiness and success in your endeavors and thanks again for your input. I appreciate it all very much!

Best wishes!

Connie


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Ann
Zone: 4b
Date: 11-Sep-01 07:33 PM EST

How about those fantastic orange or lemon scented marigolds, Lulu is one, goes on forever without deadheading. Scaevola (Fan flower) Bacopa, Thunbergia - black-eyed susan vine. Ageratum is nice and no trouble too.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Linda L
Zone:
Date: 12-Sep-01 10:01 PM EST

Vinca periwinkle is an easy care annual. I like it in the pink shades. I don't have many flowers that I do deadhead but I would like to mention what has helped me with what used to be a weeding problem. I have saved a LOT of time this year by putting down some black plastic, cutting holes in it and setting in the annuals, and then covering the plastic with white gravel or rock to hold the plastic down. This helps hold in the moisture and keeps out the weeds. I did the same thing to a vegetable area and it has worked GREAT. I had some health problems come up this spring and was very glad I had used the plastic this way, as I had to cut back on my outdoor work. I hope this info will be of some help. Also I found that taking magnesium and calcium tablets is helpful for arthritic pain and also for leg cramps.I buy the "chelated" formula.It's easier for your body to absorb it.


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From: Connie
Zone: 1a
Date: 13-Sep-01 01:29 PM EST

Thank you, Ann and Linda for more flowers to consider. The pink Vinca periwinkle sounds lovely. Marigolds are a showy flower but I could never stand their scent. Now that they are lemon scented I may consider them for my "little garden in the forest" or the flower bed on the north side of the house.

Linda, I take Adalat for my hiogh blood pressure so calcium supplements are out as Adalat is a calcium channel blocker. However, I do drink plenty of skim milk so think I'm getting sufficient calcium. As for magnesium, I do take Centrum so hopefully am getting enough magnesium as well.

I don't have a problem with weeds as I plant my flowers so close together that there is no room for weeds to grow! Your idea of the plastic is a good one though and will no doubt be of help to someone else.

Best wishes to all gardeners for the remainder of this growing season and for next year's upcoming growing season!

As ever,

Connie


Subject: RE: Annuals that don't need deadheading
From:
Zone:
Date: 14-Sep-01 03:08 PM EST


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