General Discussion:

low light plants???


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
D.D.26-Jul-01 11:48 PM EST 3a   
Susan27-Jul-01 07:46 AM EST 6a   
Debbie27-Jul-01 03:14 PM EST   
Will Creed27-Jul-01 04:53 PM EST   
D.D.28-Jul-01 11:30 AM EST   
Wendy28-Jul-01 02:23 PM EST   
Wendy28-Jul-01 02:24 PM EST   
28-Jul-01 02:28 PM EST   
Will Creed, Horticulturist28-Jul-01 08:58 PM EST   
Brian @ P&P Plants29-Jul-01 12:23 PM EST 3   
Will Creed29-Jul-01 04:35 PM EST   
dieffenbachia30-Oct-01 11:32 AM EST   
Budding Comic30-Oct-01 04:40 PM EST   
20-Nov-01 08:11 PM EST   


Subject: low light plants???
From: D.D.
Zone: 3a
Date: 26-Jul-01 11:48 PM EST

We are building a den in the third level of our house. I would like to put a few plants in it. It is on the west side of the house and has a ground level window. It does not get any direct light because of mature trees in front, but will get some indirect light. Any suggestions of plants that might survive?


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Susan
Zone: 6a
Date: 27-Jul-01 07:46 AM EST

Ivies are probably a good place to start...


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Debbie
Zone:
Date: 27-Jul-01 03:14 PM EST

Dieffenbachia, parlor palm, spider plant, grape ivy, various ferns, rubber plant and mother inlaws tongue will do okay but mother inlaws tongue does better with higher light, Peperomia.


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Will Creed
Zone:
Date: 27-Jul-01 04:53 PM EST

You have more light than you realize, assuming that your plants are placed moderately close to the window and the windows are left uncovered during the day. Also, bear in mind that unless your trees are evergreens, they will be leafless for about half of the year.

What range of temperatures do you anticipate for this new space? What sized plants are you interested in?


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: D.D.
Zone:
Date: 28-Jul-01 11:30 AM EST

Some of the trees are evergreens. There is one nountain ash to the north as you look out the window and a lodgepole pine about 20 feet straight out from the window. There is an overhang right above the window. I have space for a large (8ft.or so) plant and a ledge about 3 or 4 inches wide on the wall under the window. As well I was thinking on otp of the filing cabinet or computer desk to keep me from piling junk up there. There is a heat vent in the ceiling of the room so the temperatures should be average house temperature. (70 - 78). Thanks for your help.


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Wendy
Zone:
Date: 28-Jul-01 02:23 PM EST


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Wendy
Zone:
Date: 28-Jul-01 02:24 PM EST


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From:
Zone:
Date: 28-Jul-01 02:28 PM EST

Devil's Ivy, prayer plant to name just two.


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Will Creed, Horticulturist
Zone:
Date: 28-Jul-01 08:58 PM EST

All of the low light mentioned by others are fine, but you do not have to limit yourself to those choices for plants located right in front of the window. Here are some other options.

Large plants: Kentia palm, rhapis palm, bamboo palm (a mite magnet), schefflera amate, schefflera arboricola, dracaena marginata, dracaena pleomele refelxa, ficus benjamina, ficus elastica (rubber tree), ficus lyrata, ficus alii, and ming aralia.

Smaller plants: ZZ plant, jade, grape ivy, hedera ivy, bromeliad, anthurium, ponytail palm, and sanseveria.


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Brian @ P&P Plants
Zone: 3
Date: 29-Jul-01 12:23 PM EST

The large leaved plants require less light. Their large leaves are large solar panels. They have developed that way as they were originally growing in the shade of trees. One thing you could do is get a light meter and record how much light that is available for the plants. Take the readings at the different places that you would like to place your plants. Also take the redaings at different times of the day, e.g. early morning, noon, mid afternoon, evening and after dark when all you have on is your lights. Hope this helps.


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Will Creed
Zone:
Date: 29-Jul-01 04:35 PM EST

Brian - Unfortunately, there are so many exceptions to the large vs. small leaf rule that it renders that generalization useless. Pothos and philodendron are two low light plants that have rather small leaves. Rubber trees and ficus lyratas grow in high light and have rather large leaves.

Digital light meters are fine, but they are expensive ($65 or more). The cheaper $20 models are too inaccurate to rely on and they break very easily.


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: dieffenbachia
Zone:
Date: 30-Oct-01 11:32 AM EST


Subject: RE: low light plants???
From: Budding Comic
Zone:
Date: 30-Oct-01 04:40 PM EST

Not only is 'dieffenbachia' a low light plant, it appears it's not 'too bright' either. Although I must admit none of my plants can send e-mails.


Subject: spider plants
From:
Zone:
Date: 20-Nov-01 08:11 PM EST


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