General Discussion:

Joy Of Morning Glories


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Mr. Morning Glory Man09-Feb-01 04:19 AM EST   
Elsa01-Jun-05 09:10 PM EST   
Elsa01-Jun-05 09:11 PM EST   
Patricia02-Jun-05 06:20 PM EST 5   
Pippin02-Jun-05 07:25 PM EST 6   
D.B06-Jun-05 11:57 AM EST 6   
DebbieC08-Jun-05 08:34 PM EST 3   
TaterTot29-Jun-05 11:15 AM EST 6   


Subject: Joy Of Morning Glories
From: Mr. Morning Glory Man
Zone:
Date: 09-Feb-01 04:19 AM EST

What a joy to awaken every summer morning to a new fresh flush of Morning Glory blooms. What a treat to hurry outside in the sparkling dew and catch a dozen blooms just opening to the sun. It is a continual fascination how the flowers race through their life cycle, a mere bud one day, a full blown flower the next, and finished forever by that nightfall. Such beauty for such a short time. Fortunately the plant does it all over again the next day, and the next, and the next, until the first strong frost in the fall. Because of this blooming habit Morning Glories have served in past centuries as the symbol of the transience of life: flowers opening in the morning symbolize birth, in full bloom by midday representing the vigour of youth, and fading in the evening signifying old age. Folklore also tells us that Morning Glories were used by witches. The trumpet shaped blooms were gathered three days before the full moon to make the witches powers particularly potent. The seeds are poisonous and sometimes hallucinatory, which may be why the connection was made between the plant and witches. In the Language of Flowers, Morning Glories denote affectation, pretense or insincerity, probably because of the short life of the bloom contrasting with the heart shaped leaves. Morning Glories were a favourite vine in our grandmother's gardens climbing over latticework or trailing along a fence. They can twine and climb almost anything including a steel post. The vine is part of the Impomoea family which also includes the sweet potato. Native to the tropics, Morning Glories are used as an annual vine in northern climates. They can grow up to 10 feet or more in two months, and begin flowering while the vine is still young. The blooms come in blue, purple, pink, scarlet, white or multicoloured hues. Popular varieties are the Heavenly Blue - large forget-me-not blue blooms, and Flying Saucers - striped sky blue and white flowers with a pale lemon yellow throat. Morning Glories are easy to grow if a few simple requirements are met. The seed coat is very hard and should be nicked with a file before planting, or soaked overnight in tepid water. They can be planted directly in the ground once the soil is warm. The vine dislikes being transplanted but it can be done successfully if the plants are started in individual 3-inch fibre pots so that the roots are not disturbed.

Morning Glory seedlings do not fare well with competition in the garden so it is helpful to start them indoors four to six weeks before the last frost is due. Once the weather and soil are warm and the Morning Glories been transplanted outside, stand back - you can almost watch them grow. Morning Glories do not need a rich soil and fertilizing tends to grow more leaves than flowers. Full sun, and not too much watering keep the plants happy. Because they grow so fast Morning Glories can be used effectively to cover fences and walls or block off an area you wish to screen. They are attractive in hanging baskets, window boxes and containers, and are sometimes used for a temporary ground cover. They can also be grown as a house plant in the winter, requiring at least four hours of direct sunlight a day, night temperatures of 60 degrees Fahrenheit, and daytime temperatures of 70 degrees or higher. Keep the soil barely moist and feed bimonthly with a half-strength fertilizer beginning when the plants are four inches tall. Inside or out, climbing or trailing, Morning Glories can bring glory to your morning, and deserve a sunny spot in anyone's garden.

http://www.exoticplants.org.uk "Morning Glory Corner, the most informative place on morning glories!" If you love morning glories as much as I do contact me!


Subject: RE: Joy Of Morning Glories
From: Elsa
Zone:
Date: 01-Jun-05 09:10 PM EST

I need help in learning how to grown morning glory in a container pot. I do not have a outdoor garden so I grow my plants indoor in containers. The morning glory I am trying to grow is a Picotee blue. It has already sprouted seedlings. What do I do next.


Subject: RE: Joy Of Morning Glories
From: Elsa
Zone:
Date: 01-Jun-05 09:11 PM EST

I need help in learning how to grown morning glory in a container pot. I do not have a outdoor garden so I grow my plants indoor in containers. The morning glory I am trying to grow is a Picotee blue. It has already sprouted seedlings. What do I do next.


Subject: RE: Joy Of Morning Glories
From: Patricia (iris1@rogers.com)
Zone: 5
Date: 02-Jun-05 06:20 PM EST

How about placing them in a pot with some soil?

My favorite morning glory is Grandpa Ott - a deep purple with a fuschia "star" design.


Subject: RE: Joy Of Morning Glories
From: Pippin
Zone: 6
Date: 02-Jun-05 07:25 PM EST

Any tips on growing the Moonflower? I do not have any luck with them but keep trying year after year.


Subject: RE: Joy Of Morning Glories
From: D.B
Zone: 6
Date: 06-Jun-05 11:57 AM EST

The moonflower is a great favorite of mine.

To start them, I simply soak the seed for 24 hours and potted in a soiless seed starter.

Once the seedlings peak their heads up, I provide a bamboo form for climbing (a cheap plant support from Canadian Tire). They are pretty low maintenance after that. Just keep a close eye and when the leaves droop a bit, they need a drink.

I have actually been growing them continuously all winter in a sunny window!

They grow a bit weary after a few months so I simply start again. They produce new seed everytime so I have a continuous supply!

The blue moonflower I have produces gorgeous giant cobalt blue flowers that are quite wonderful.

Thank you to Mr. Morning Glory Man for the folklore....!!

D.


Subject: RE: Joy Of Morning Glories
From: DebbieC
Zone: 3
Date: 08-Jun-05 08:34 PM EST

I love morning glories but every year I seem to have the same problem with them; once they start to bloom most of the leaves shrivel up and look really ratty. I know they're not supposed to look like that; any ideas? Also, I as well have never had any luck with the moonflower; I can get it to grow leaves but never seem to get it to flower.


Subject: RE: Joy Of Morning Glories
From: TaterTot
Zone: 6
Date: 29-Jun-05 11:15 AM EST

D.B. Would you be interested in making a trade for some of your blue moonflower seeds?

Any way to post or send me a pic?

Thanks for your consideration :-)


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