General Discussion:

Container Gardening


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
Amanda02-Feb-01 06:01 PM EST   
02-Feb-01 11:05 PM EST   
Flower Lover02-Feb-01 11:10 PM EST   
doug03-Feb-01 01:18 AM EST   
ana Zone 605-Feb-01 06:23 PM EST   
Flower Lover05-Feb-01 08:22 PM EST   
Debbie09-Feb-01 01:50 PM EST   
ana zone 610-Feb-01 04:29 PM EST   
Flower Lover11-Feb-01 03:28 AM EST   
Joanne19-Mar-01 02:37 PM EST   
Marina19-Mar-01 03:34 PM EST   
Karen19-Mar-01 06:30 PM EST   
Flower Lover19-Mar-01 09:47 PM EST   
Serena20-Mar-01 03:05 PM EST   
Debbie21-Mar-01 09:48 AM EST   
Serena C.21-Mar-01 11:47 PM EST   
Tonett Wojtasik23-Mar-01 01:23 PM EST   
Flower Lover23-Mar-01 06:23 PM EST   
Marina24-Mar-01 03:38 PM EST   
Marina24-Mar-01 03:41 PM EST   
Connie13-May-01 07:39 PM EST 1a   


Subject: Container Gardening
From: Amanda
Zone:
Date: 02-Feb-01 06:01 PM EST

I live in an apartment so I must do all of my gardening in containers. I plan to grow tomatoes and green peppers in pots as well make some hanging baskets for my family and friends. In the hanging baskets I will be mixing and matching with petunias, mimulus, nicotaina, and lobelia. I have ordered all my seeds from Veseys as my late grandfather who had the best green thumb I know, swore by their products. I plan to start all seeds inside but I don't have a grow light as they are too expensive for my budget at the time. But I do have access to greenhouses. If anyone has any advice about growing the plants I have named or advice on container gardening in general, I welcome your tips.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From:
Zone:
Date: 02-Feb-01 11:05 PM EST


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Flower Lover
Zone:
Date: 02-Feb-01 11:10 PM EST

The wave petunia, hanging lobelia, and miniature pansies make lovely hanging baskets. Last year I had hot pink wave petunias, blue hanging lobelia, and yellow miniature pansies in my hanging baskets. They looked marvelous!


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: doug
Zone:
Date: 03-Feb-01 01:18 AM EST

If you have your fridge located in a place that you can provide a regular day's worth of light (4-6hrs or so). You could grow all the named plants at home on top of the fridge.. and they may germinate faster having bottom heat (as opposed to top heat from a grow light). During the initial stages of seeding through to first true leaves, the soil should be misted every day (use a clean sprayer bottle (never been used with chemicals) to keep the soil moist.. too much water and you may end up losing your seedlings/seeds to damping off or fungus). After the first true leaves emerge (usually the second pair of leaves) you can start watering every other day with a watering can until your ready to transplant.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: ana Zone 6
Zone:
Date: 05-Feb-01 06:23 PM EST

Before we bought a home, I used containers to hold just about anything I liked. After a few years I discovered that the best plants for containers weren't always the ones I liked most. Pansies are fine up until mid June--then they get leggy and wilted ..third floor balconies are too hot (eastern exposure). Be bold and replace them or else the next bunch of plants will take longer to get established. I found that ivy geraniums can take drought like conditions. Lobelia although gorgeous can not take drought--the flowers go to seed and looks a mess by mid summer, again maybe its too hot for them.Petunias, convolulus, potato vine, begonias are all good choices. I guess thats why they are so popular


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Flower Lover
Zone:
Date: 05-Feb-01 08:22 PM EST

You can still grow pansies in containers, Just cut them back when they're too leggy. That makes them bush out more. Lobelia, too, is great, even in the drought. If you mist them daily they don't go to seed and, although the hanging ones I bought stated a length of 18 inches, with daily misting, they grew at least 4 feet! My son had an ivy geranium last summer which looked lovely when he first bought it but the flowers didn't last long. I wonder what he did wrong?


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Debbie
Zone:
Date: 09-Feb-01 01:50 PM EST

I always give my containers and hanging baskets 20-20-20 on a regular basis (each week) throughout the summer months and they grow "like weeds".


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: ana zone 6
Zone:
Date: 10-Feb-01 04:29 PM EST

I agree with Debbie. I fertilize my baskets with 18-24-16 (especially the ivy geraniums) and they grow really well. Thanks for the info about lobelia. I love these plants but get disheartened every year when they get brown and stringy...by the way they make great pressed flowers. The colour of the blue sapphire lobelia stays true .


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Flower Lover
Zone:
Date: 11-Feb-01 03:28 AM EST

Using 18-24-16 rather than 20-20-20 promotes the flowering of the plants. 20-20-20 is good for greenry. My grandmother used to press flowers when she was a girl. Perhaps that is where I acquired my love of flowers so thanks for the suggestion. The blue sapphires are my favorites too. I don't know if my son used fertilizer or not on his ivy geranium. If he gets another I will be sure to pass on the information.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Joanne
Zone:
Date: 19-Mar-01 02:37 PM EST

Is it possible to grow sweet peas in a container? I would like to try them in a "window box length" type of container to put along a driveway. This is my only southern exposure and I have been told they like a lot of sun. I love sweet peas as a cut flower in summer. Any suggestions?


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Marina
Zone:
Date: 19-Mar-01 03:34 PM EST

You can grow sweet peas in containers, but I don't know about planting them in window boxes. Remember that container grown plants need a container that is in proportion to their top growth, and as sweet peas grow fairly large, you'll need a big container.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Karen
Zone:
Date: 19-Mar-01 06:30 PM EST

I have attempted to start seeds indoors for the past 3 years and have never had any luck. If "damping off" means the seedlings turn kind of translucent then wilt and disintegrate, then that's my problem, I guess. I only ever misted them, but perhaps with too heavy a hand. Despite my past failures, I will try, try again.

I've had the same poor luck with house plants and containers outside. It seems that I can't get it to grow unless I stick it in the ground. I've come to realize that I have to fertilize container plants once in awhile, but is the optimum for this?


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Flower Lover
Zone:
Date: 19-Mar-01 09:47 PM EST

I live in zone 1. 3 years ago I decided to seed my sweet peas which I had kept in my desk for a number of years. I soaked them in water overnight and planted them on July 1st. They were the climbing variety and, believe it or not, I actually had flowers that year! As for fertilizing, once the flowers start blooming I fertilize with 15-20-15 every 2 weeks. Bush sweet peas would be the best ones to grow in containers. The climbing variety I planted, I put directly into my flower beds at the front of the house. Hope this helps! Cheers! Flower Lover


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Serena
Zone:
Date: 20-Mar-01 03:05 PM EST

I grow my seeds in Lee Valley Tools' Self-Watering Seed Starter which I bought two years ago. It's the best system. I didn't have to worry about damping off. Most of my seeds sprouted within a week (some took longer). When the seed package said it will take 10-15 days to germinate, using the Seed Starter, it took less than a week. Here's the website if you want to see how it looks like. http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.asp?page=10645&category=2,44713,40757&abspage=1&ccurrency=1&SID=

If you want to grow tomatoes in containers, buy the types that are "Determinate". They are the compact, shrub type (it doesn't grow like a vine) and use soil that are meant for containers. Once the tomatoes are at least 6" (inches) high, start fertilizing them with a tomato fertilizer. I also add crushed eggshells in the soil to give the tomato plants some calcium. If you put a 1" layer of mulch on the surface of the soil, you don't have to constantly water the tomatoes.

Scarlet Runner Beans (you need three 6' stakes to let them climb up), cucumbers, and Begonias (to name a few) do very well in containers (I grow them every year). There are Begonias that grow upright or those that are for hanging baskets. Hope this helps.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Debbie
Zone:
Date: 21-Mar-01 09:48 AM EST

I have tried to grow pepers in containers for the last couple of years. Both years I had a lot of peppers but they were very small, most were too small to use. Anyone have any ideas what I did wrong. The container was fairly large, but I admit I did not fertilize.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Serena C.
Zone:
Date: 21-Mar-01 11:47 PM EST

Vegetables and flowers that are going to be grown in containers need fertilizer.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Tonett Wojtasik
Zone:
Date: 23-Mar-01 01:23 PM EST

Last year I grew miniature roses in containers, the kind you can get in the supermarket now. I have tried to plant them directly in the garden and they never seem to do well. They were magnificentin the containers. They grew in size according to the container they were in and they bloomed profusely until fall. I tried yellow, peach and deep pink. Good Luch


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Flower Lover
Zone:
Date: 23-Mar-01 06:23 PM EST

One question, is it advisable to change the soil in the containers each year or can one use the same soil year after year? (I fertilize regularly) Another question, does the neighborhood cats using the soil in the flowerbeds pollute the soil? I always remove (with rubber gloves) the feces that have accumulated over the winter but what about their urine? I think it is acidic and perhaps the soil needs something added to it to neutralize this? Once I transplant my bedding plants, I keep the flower beds well watered and this keeps the cats away during the growing season. Thanks in advance for any advice you may have for me! Flower Lover


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Marina
Zone:
Date: 24-Mar-01 03:38 PM EST

I've read container gardening books tha tell you that you absolutly must change the soil every year, but after three years gardening in pots, I've yet to do this and everything is still going strong. The idea of changing the soil is to stop any disease spreading. The only problem I've ever encounter are vine weveils.To get rid of any excessive salt build up, and get rid of the cat urine, give your containers a good flushing with water periodically. Would putting gravel, or something simmilar on top of your soil deter the cats? One other thing that might work, although it seems kind of nasty, is to bury twigs, or prunings from roses or something else prickly just under the soil surface.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Marina
Zone:
Date: 24-Mar-01 03:41 PM EST

I've read container gardening books tha tell you that you absolutly must change the soil every year, but after three years gardening in pots, I've yet to do this and everything is still going strong. The idea of changing the soil is to stop any disease spreading. The only problem I've ever encounter are vine weveils.To get rid of any excessive salt build up, and get rid of the cat urine, give your containers a good flushing with water periodically. Would putting gravel, or something simmilar on top of your soil deter the cats? One other thing that might work, although it seems kind of nasty, is to bury twigs, or prunings from roses or something else prickly just under the soil surface.


Subject: RE: Container Gardening
From: Connie
Zone: 1a
Date: 13-May-01 07:39 PM EST

I have had problems with tiny spiders hatching in very hot weather and appearing in some of my containers and in one paticular spot in my flower bed. I find that spraying them with soapy water gets rid of them but I was wondering where they come from. Do they sit dormant in the flower bed/container and then hatch when it's hot? If this is so, is there any way I can treat the soil so as to destroy them, thus preventing their developing in the first place? Thank you for your suggestions! Cheers! Connie


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