General Discussion:

no lawn alternatives


Messages posted to thread:

From:Date:Zone:
phil martyn16-Nov-00 09:05 PM EST   
Janet17-Nov-00 02:17 PM EST   
Bria @ Prairie & Parkland Plants17-Nov-00 02:38 PM EST   
p martyn17-Nov-00 04:02 PM EST   
23-Nov-00 11:58 AM EST   
22-Apr-01 12:16 PM EST 2a   
ingrid22-Apr-01 12:56 PM EST 3   
Susan22-Apr-01 03:42 PM EST 6b   


Subject: no lawn alternatives
From: phil martyn
Zone:
Date: 16-Nov-00 09:05 PM EST

HI I LIVE IN LONDON ONTARIO AND I AM LOOKING FOR ALTERNATIVES TO HAVING GRASS IN MY LANDSCAPE.WOULD LIKE TO GROW SOMETHING ATTRACTIVE FRONT AND BACK ON MY TINY YARD WITHOUT BEING TO RADICAL AND INVOKING DISDAIN FROM NEIGHBOURS OPEN TO SUGGESTIONS.COMMENTS AND LINKS TO RESOURCES MORE THAN WELCOME.THANKS.


Subject: RE: no lawn alternatives
From: Janet
Zone:
Date: 17-Nov-00 02:17 PM EST

What level of maintenance do you want? Do you like to putter around the yard, or prefer something low-maintenance? Do you want a variety of plants, or one easy ground cover? How much are you willing to spend -- interlocking brick or river stones could replace some of your grass, and both look great. How tiny is your yard? Is it shaded or sunny? Give us some more info and we'll help you out!


Subject: RE: no lawn alternatives
From: Bria @ Prairie & Parkland Plants
Zone:
Date: 17-Nov-00 02:38 PM EST

Phil; As you can see from Janet's message, we need more information so we can give you some suggestions. Please provide.


Subject: RE: no lawn alternatives
From: p martyn
Zone:
Date: 17-Nov-00 04:02 PM EST

AS I WAS STATING,I'M SO TIRED OF MOWING LAWNS,I HAVE LITERALLY MADE A CAREER OF IT AS I AM EMPLOYED IN MY LOCAL PARKS DEPARTMENT.I'M MOVING TO A HOUSE WITH A SMALL LOT.I WANT TO PLANT NATIVE PLANTS IN A NATURAL SETTING,I ALSO REQUIRE SOME AREAS FOR PLAY FOR MY YOUNG SON.THOUGHT I MIGHT TRY MULCHES AND DIFFERENT STONES IN THESE AREAS.DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY CONTACTS THAT COULD HELP ME.I LIVE IN SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO,A CAROLIAN AREA.LASTLY I WOULD LIKE TO REATRACT WILDLIFE FOR MY SON AND MY INTEREST.THANKS TO ALL


Subject: RE: no lawn alternatives
From:
Zone:
Date: 23-Nov-00 11:58 AM EST

Phil, our neighbourhood has been moving away from lawns for years. I'm in a slightly colder climate, 3A, so you have even more options available to you. You need to visit a greenhouse to get ideas. I've been noticing a new category called "steppables" which is what it seems. Small shrubs for the birds, bird baths, ground covers, periwinkle and thyme, creeping phlox, seem to do really well here. I love the bark mulches, but this can be a problem with leaves in the fall, although one neighbour bought a leaf vacuum that worked very well. Spend the winter exploring catalogues on line.


Subject: RE: no lawn alternatives
From:
Zone: 2a
Date: 22-Apr-01 12:16 PM EST


Subject: RE: no lawn alternatives
From: ingrid
Zone: 3
Date: 22-Apr-01 12:56 PM EST

hi phil, i'm from sw ontario originally and I remember reading about a native garden near ?hamilton or further south with literally Native involvement (Six Nations!). They had received some funding to grow native shrubs, trees, grasses, etc. and made a demonstration garden, I believe. Also, in your neck of the woods, isn't there a wildflower nursery, ?Schomberg's or something like that? Check this search site for more info. There is also a grass/willow nursery from Christina Lake, BC called Bluestem Nursery. They're into naturescaping. Oh, and there is a ?company here in alberta called exactly that 'Naturescaping' and they have a great book out (attracting wildlife, etc.). You got me going! Sorry, I 'm not very specific. It's out there!


Subject: RE: no lawn alternatives
From: Susan
Zone: 6b
Date: 22-Apr-01 03:42 PM EST

Bunchberries are a good native groundcover - very pretty white blossoms in spring and edible (if not pareticularyly tasty) bright red fruit in late summer - the birds like it (and I did as a kid!) Wild ginger makes a good groundcover. No obvious flowers (they're there but hidden by the leaves) but the foliage is pretty, especially in contrast with ferny leaves like Jacob's Ladder or ferns. European Wild Ginger is evergreen but, if you want to stay with native plants, the native stuff is deciduous.

There are lots of shrubs that provide fruit for birds. A useful reference is actually the Sheridan Nursery catalogue - native plants are marked with a symbol and ones that attract birds have a little bluebird beside them - a very useful reference (but no so good for shopping as there are no prices listed!)

Ingrid suggested a Six Nations place - maybe she was thinking of Sweet Grass Gardens in Brantford on the Six Nations reserve. It's about an hour from London. You could go there for ideas...


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