Canada Blooms 2009
Toronto, Canada
 

From March 18 to 22, 2009, Canada Blooms returned to Toronto to transform the Metro Toronto Convention Centre into Canada’s largest flower and garden festival. Now in its thirteenth year, the 2009 Festival celebrates the best of Canadian gardens and explores the tradition of gardening and horticultural excellence across the country.

The RBC Speakers Series presented five education days featuring North America’s premier gardening experts. Themed days included Organic Gardening Day, Design Day, and Scents and Sensibilities.

Canada’s Largest Standard Judged Flower Show - With the theme ‘Sea to Sea,’ the Garden Hall was filled with exciting amateur competitions in horticulture and floral design from the best Ontario flower arrangers and international competitors

Plastic nursery pots can be a landfill nightmare, but in the hands of talented artists Jennifer Marman and Daniel Borins, they beaome a provocative and unconventional work of art. This renowned artistic team created Land-Escape, a sculptured landscape that re-imagined a landfill site teaming with discarded plastic pots, transforming shredded plastics, bulk material and pellets into a brightly coloured art installation.

The largest garden at this year's show, The Heart and Stroke Foundation Pulse Garden, in partnership with Humber College, featured flowering dogwoods, Japanese maples, rhododendrons and ‘Red Prince’ weigelas, a variety of perennials and signature Foundation red and white tulips. At one end, a waterfall and pool encircled by a wheelchair ramp added to the beauty and tranquility. Across from the pool, nursing students were on hand to take blood pressure readings.

Canada Blooms is a not-for-profit volunteer-driven event which to date has reinvested over $500,000 in proceeds into community horticultural projects. This year’s proceeds will benefit the Toronto Botanical Gardens’ children’s programs.

  • It takes five days of preparation to create over six acres of breathtaking gardens

  • About 500 people work around the clock to transform the Metro Toronto Convention Centre into Canada’s largest flower and garden festival.

  • It takes about 32 dump trucks to bring in over 1,400 tons of sand, and eight truckloads of mulch to create the plant beds for the Festival.

  • $1.5 million of specialized equipment is donated by major horticultural equipment manufacturers, such as forklifts, skid steer and wheel loaders, to do the work.

  • About 500 people work around the clock to transform the Metro Toronto Convention Centre into Canada’s largest flower and garden festival.

  • It takes about 32 dump trucks to bring in over 1,400 tons of sand, and eight truckloads of mulch to create the plant beds for the Festival.

  • $1.5 million of specialized equipment is donated by major horticultural equipment manufacturers, such as forklifts, skid steer and wheel loaders, to do the work.

  • Growers prepare more than 300 trees, 400 shrubs, 4,000 pots of perennials, 600 potted evergreens, 1,400 flowers, and about 80,000 bulbs for the Festival.

  • A technique called “forcing” is used to ensure that each of these trees, shrubs and flowers are in bloom during the five-day Festival. Trees and plants are artificially cooled in June to put them into dormancy, and then brought into greenhouses in January and ‘fooled’ into thinking that it’s time to grow again.

  • There are more than 100 dedicated individuals from The Garden Club of Toronto and Landscape Ontario, who work throughout the year to bring Canada Blooms to life. During the Festival, there are nearly 800 more volunteers from across Canada who contribute their time.
    www.canadablooms.com

 

  • New Eden
  • Kids Garden
  • Plant a Row Grow a Row